Academy of Chiropractic’s Doctors PI Program

Clinical Information: Diagnosing #6
(section 10)


From the Desk of :
Mark Studin DC, FASBE (C), DAAPM, DAAMLP

“Concussion Blood Test”

Now Available in the United Stated



3 years ago, I talked about biomarkers for the objectification of concussion [mild traumatic brain injury/mTBI] and now this test is approved for the diagnosis of concussion.  Here is the link from the FDA site and there is NO DEBATE AS TO THE AUTHENTICITY OR ACCURACY OF THE TEST…We will be writing more on this, in particular how to ensure you are using the right language for ordering the test, ordering timely and reporting properly to the medical PCP and specialists that are working with your patient.  READ AND LEARN…

https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm596531.htm


HERE IS A SAMPLE OF A PORTION OF THE REPORT

“A blood test to aid in concussion evaluation is an important tool for the American public and for our Service Members abroad who need access to quick and accurate tests,” said Jeffrey Shuren, M.D., director of the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. “The FDA’s review team worked closely with the test developer and the U.S. Department of Defense to expedite a blood test for the evaluation of mTBI that can be used both in the continental U.S. as well as foreign U.S. laboratories that service the American military.”

The Brain Trauma Indicator works by measuring levels of proteins, known as UCH-L1 and GFAP, that are released from the brain into blood and measured within 12 hours of head injury. Levels of these blood proteins after mTBI/concussion can help predict which patients may have intracranial lesions visible by CT scan and which won’t. Being able to predict if patients have a low probability of intracranial lesions can help health care professionals in their management of patients and the decision to perform a CT scan. Test results can be available within 3 to 4 hours.

The FDA evaluated data from a multi-center, prospective clinical study of 1,947 individual blood samples from adults with suspected mTBI/concussion and reviewed the product’s performance by comparing mTBI/concussion blood tests results with CT scan results. The Brain Trauma Indicator was able to predict the presence of intracranial lesions on a CT scan 97.5 percent of the time and those who did not have intracranial lesions on a CT scan 99.6 percent of the time. These findings indicate that the test can reliably predict the absence of intracranial lesions and that health care professionals can incorporate this tool into the standard of care for patients to rule out the need for a CT scan in at least one-third of patients who are suspected of having mTBI.

        DO NOT CALL ME AND ASK WHERE YOU CAN GET THIS DONE, THAT IS ON YOU TO CALL LOCALLY TO SEE IF IT IS OFFERED… AND IF NOT, PRESSURE THEM TO GET IT. Call local labs and hospitals.